On Cheating

Before I tell of the best damn training run in the world, I feel it needs to be said that some people will not like what I did at all.  I’ve heard from a lot of bloggers that have commented on bandits, ghosts and race jumpers.  Cheaters.

Here are the race related incidents that I feel are unequivocally cheating:

  • Running a full race that you don’t pay for — and taking the medal.  People that head to the kinkos, show up at the race with their bootleg bib, run it and then accept the medal at the end.  That’s not OK.   That is not only cheating, that’s stealing.  Those are bandits.
  • Running a full race that you don’t pay for — and winning.  Or setting a world record  That’s really really strange. Like really really strange.
  • Running a race, hopped up on drugs, wining — I’m not OK with this.  But I don’t know too many recreational runners doing it.
  • Lying about your marathon time while running for office.  Weirdo.

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Real talk:  some people are going to say what I did after the marathon failure is wrong and I’m OK with that.

After I left Hilary I jumped in at mile 7.75, right after the Grand Floridian.  I met Mandy, with my bib already pinned on, and, as I promised her months ago, I paced her to the finish.  The plan the whole time we slogged through multiple CCT miles together was for her to join Hilary and I for the marathon.  The three of us would get through it together.  So while Hilary wasn’t going to be able to see our dream through that day, I knew that I couldn’t leave Mandy hanging.  As part of the Dopey Challenge she had already run over 20 miles that week.  I thought she would really appreciate having a helping hand through the last 26.2 — or at least part of it.

One key distinction here is that I did not cross the finish line with Mandy.  I peeled off right after the EPCOT geodesic{it’s not a ball or a sphere as MB will tell you repeatedly}.  I didn’t cross the finish line for two reasons:  1. I had come there to cross the finish line with Hilary and Hilary wasn’t there so it wasn’t happening and 2.  I didn’t want to steal any glory from anyone.

Let me be very clear:  I do not think crossing the finish line that day would have been the worst thing and I reserve no judgement for people in my position {bibbed, trained but somehow sidelinned runner} that may have.  It was a personal choice and one that I knew I could live with.  And isn’t that what running is really — making choices, based on your situation, your mindset, your training, sometimes after tons of thought, sometimes on a whim?  It is to me.

I’m ready to hear from you on cheating!

 

9 thoughts on “On Cheating

  1. Entirely Amelia says:

    I don’t see how anyone could see anything wrong with this. Even if you had finished and grabbed a medal, at no point during the race were you taking something you didn’t pay for. One of those medals was yours and you paid for all of the resources on the course. All I see when I read this (and the entire Paul Ryan Curse saga) is someone being literally as selfLESS as possible throughout the whole weekend.

    But, yes, cheaters suck and I hate them.

  2. Jenereesa @ ScootaDoot says:

    I agree with you all around. Additionally, since you were running in a race that you had paid for, the resources were there if you needed water/banana/etc. You were helping a friend and I think that is a-okay. ❤

  3. John says:

    I don’t know this “Epcot geodisc” thing MB is referring to…do you mean the Epcot orb? Sphere? Ball? Circle? Oh! You mean the Epcot tetrahedron. Of course.

    Also, i’m not runner-chic but I’m not sure why what you did could be construed as cheating. Did you knock over some of the other marathoners while you ran? Get a bit stabby as you neared the finish? Sounds to me like you did a very nice thing for your friend(s).

    • lnrbailey says:

      Thank you! MB takes umbrage with your tetrahedron comment. “A tetrahedron is a four faced, three dimensional shape.” Nerds.

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